The touchy transformations: Age regression and age progression

The uppermost of these two pieces of art got me suspended from DeviantArt for a week. The art itself was removed. The objection was apparently that the art depicted full-frontal nudity of an underage character. I tried to explain that underage nudes are not automatically pornographic. If they were, every parent who had ever taken photos of their kids taking baths or toddling around the house in their birthday suits would be in trouble.

I’m of the age where I, and others, saw a LOT of age regression art and stories. From at least the mid-1950s to a decade later, I don’t think there was a year where, at some point, Superman or one of his friends were turned into babies. Superman underwent the change a lot. Lois Lane did it at least three times. Jimmy Olsen and Perry White, and even Batman, all were regressed at least once. (The first Supergirl story I ever read, had HER being turned into a baby.)

Years ago, I was on a message board (remember them?) devoted to giantesses. I posted one message where I mentioned my interest in all transformations, including age regression. I got a response saying I was only interested in women being regressed “so you can fuck them!” And that, in a nutshell, is why so many people object to age regression art and stories.

There may be people who fantasize about age regression for that reason. I’m not one of them. For me, the interest is in seeing how the regressed deals with the regression. It’s why I went to see the movie Little earlier this year. And it’s why I wrote my novel Skye Sparkler, tossing in with it the added complication of the regressed character also being the strongest person on the planet.

Magic sand, magic sand, make me small at my command!

Then, there’s age progression. The art above (done by artist Steve Sullivan) deals with that concept, taking the strip “Mary Jane and Sniffles” that was a back-up feature in the Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies comic book from years ago. This strip took Sniffles, the annoying little kid mouse from the Warner Brothers cartoons, and teamed him with a little girl named Mary Jane. Mary Jane could make herself Sniffles-sized, originally by sprinkling magic sand on herself and reciting the words in the caption above. Later (probably after complaints from parents about their kids sprinkling salt on themselves while playing Mary Jane and Sniffles), the size change came about by Mary Jane saying

Now I close my eyes real tight, and then I wish with all my might, magic words of poof, poof, piffles, make me just as small as Sniffles!

I remember one story where Mary Jane made herself even smaller by adding the words
And make Sniffles as small as a bug!

Proving the fetish was with me back then, I can remember finding it interesting that Mary Jane would shrink herself in every story, and then go on adventures with Sniffles.

About 20 years ago, I was reminded of that strip and immediately again became enamored of Mary Jane. But I came up with this twist on the subject to do an age progression which Mary Jane’s dress did not survive. That’s as far as it went, imagining an adult, nude Mary Jane. (And, I’m sure that right now, there are people reading this imagining comics’ more famous Mary Jane, MJ Watson, shrinking herself.)

Age progression transformations have been popular over the years with things like 13 Going on 30 and the movie and stage musical Big. It’s never appealed to me that much because AP happens for real, naturally, to all of us. Sometimes a good AP story comes along, however. One of the best AP and AR stories that I know of was “It’s a Gas,” which you can read here: http://www.ararchive.com/gallery3/Comics/It-s-A-Gas

I have gone through an entire night of being unable to sleep, but am now feeling tired and hope to be able to go to bed. So, once again, I must utter those words “I know there’s a lot more to be written on this subject, and I hope to do so someday.” But for now, I’ve got to go to bed.

As always, I welcome all thoughts and comments on this subject.

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